Have a Plant: Fruits & Veggies for Better Health

About The Buzz: Dipping Vegetables Increases Vegetable Intake by 80% in Children?

TheBUZZ Dipping vegetables increases vegetable intake by 80% in children?

WHAT THEY’RE SAYING
Providing dip—regular, light, or as a sauce—increased raw broccoli intake among preschoolers.

WHAT WE KNOW

It can be a struggle to get children to eat their recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables. However, there’s no need to panic! If your children are growing normally and have plenty of energy to play and learn, they’re probably getting what they need.

Kids learn primarily by example, so if you consume more fruits and vegetables, they may eventually be persuaded to do the same. And if you keep offering them healthy options each day (even if they don’t eat them), once their taste buds have matured, they may actually enjoy them! It’s also important to make eating fruits and veggies fun! Creating edible fruit and vegetable artwork, letting kids help prepare their meals, and even dipping are a few ways to make eating fruits and veggies fun!

HOW DO WE KNOW THIS?

In a recent study published in the American Dietetic Association, 152 preschool-age kids were served broccoli as a snack over seven (7) weeks. Researchers found that consumption of vegetables increased 80% when the kids were served broccoli with 2.5 ounces of ranch dressing as a dip. The results were the same whether the dip was low-fat or not.*

OUR ADVICE

Try lots of creative ways to get your kids to experiment with fruits and veggies! While at times it might be frustrating, trying new ways to prepare fruits and vegetables (we have over 1,000 recipes!) and being positive are very important when trying to get your kids to love them! Read About Picky Eaters

Creative way to get your kids to eat their veggies …

Other ways to increase kids’ fruit & veggie consumption …

 

* Fisher, J., J. Mennella, S. Hughes, et al. “Offering ‘Dip’ Promotes Intake of a Moderately-Liked Raw Vegetables among Preschoolers with Genetic Sensitivity to Bitterness.” Journal of the American Dietetic Association (2011), doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2011.08.032

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